Prof. Franz E. Weber

Prof. Franz E. Weber

Oral Biotechnology & Bioengineering, Center for Dental Medicine, University of Zurich, Switzerland

Speech Title: Osteoconduction and bone augmentation: when design meets bone biology

Abstract: In the last decades, advances in bone tissue engineering mainly based on osteoinduction and stem cell research. Only recently, new efforts focused on the micro- and nanoarchitecture needed to improve and accelerate bone regeneration. By the use of additive manufacturing, libraries of bone substitutes were produced and tested for the optimal pore size, filament dimension, or lightweight microarchitecture to treat bone defects and promote bone augmentation. To that end, we produced pore-based, filament-based and triply periodic lightweight-based scaffolds and tested them in a cranial defect and a bone augmentation model in rabbits.
For the production of scaffolds, we applied the CeraFab 7500 from Lithoz, a lithography-based additive manufacturing machine and studied tri-calcium phosphate- based and hydroxyapatite-based scaffolds. As in vivo test model, we used a calvarial defect and a bone augmentation model in rabbits. Histomorphometry and microCT analysis showed that optimal pore and filament designs for osteoconduction differ from the ones for bone augmentation. For triply periodic minimal surface lightweight microarchitectures, a single gyroid- and diamond-microarchitecture performs well in bone augmentation and cranial defect models. Small adjustments of filament-based microarchitectures orchestrate cell differentiation towards osteoblasts and facilitates angiogenesis.
In essence, we have identified the optimal triply periodic lightweight, pore-based and filament-based microarchitecture for bone augmentation purposes needed for the placement of dental implants and for cranial defects. We learned that the optimal pore-based and filament-based microarchitecture for bone augmentations differs from the best for the treatment of defects. Moreover, we saw that additive manufacturing appears as a promising tool for the production of personalized bone substitutes to be used in cranio-maxillofacial surgery, dentistry, and orthopaedics.

Keywords: Additive manufacturing, Bone substitute; Osteoconduction; bone augmentation Microarchitecture.

Biography: Franz Weber graduated from the University Konstanz (Germany) with a PhD in Biology/Muscle Biochemistry. He completed a 3-year postdoctoral training on muscle cell biology at Cornell University Medical College in New York City and served as a lecturer in the Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy. He spent the following two years at Biochemistry of the ETH Zurich working on the lipid uptake from the small intestine. In 1995, he joined the Department of Cranio-Maxillofacial and Oral Surgery at the University Hospital Zurich. Beside his obligations at the University of Zurich, he became Director of the European Technical Center of Inion Ltd in Cambridge (UK) in 2005 and occupied this position until 2009. His research encompasses additive manufacturing, bone substitutes, osteoconduction, bone morphogenetic proteins, delivery systems, epigenetics, bone and pulp tissue engineering. Franz E. Weber has authored 137 peer-reviewed research articles published in international journals amounting to more than 7234 citations, 16 patents, several review articles, book chapters, and an h-index of 40. He is member of TERMIS (Tissue Engineering international & Regenerative Medicine Society), IADR (International Association for Dental Research), DKG (German Ceramic Society), ACerS (The American Ceramic Society), and SSB+RM (Swiss Society for Biomaterials and Regenerative Medicine).
He is currently appointed as Professor of Craniofacial and Oral Biotechnology at the Center of Dental Medicine, member of the Medical and the Science Faculty of the University of Zurich.



Dr. Wencheng Zhang

Dr. Wencheng Zhang

Research Associate Professor
Institute for Regenerative Medicine
Shanghai East Hospital
School of Life Science and Technology, Tongji University, China
Speech Title:

Biography: Dr. Wencheng Zhang is a current research associate professor at Shanghai East Hospital Affiliated to Tongji University. He went to the Northwest Agriculture and Forestry University for his undergraduate with a major of bioscience from 2003 to 2007. Then, he got his PhD in regenerative medicine from the Academy of Military Medicine Science in 2012. He went to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill for his postdoctoral training with Prof. Lola M. Reid for studying the endodermal stem cells and developing the patch grafting strategy. And later, he worked as a research associate in Prof. Reid`s and Prof. Jian Liu`s labs, respectively, for investigating the biological effects of heparin sulfate glycosaminoglycans. At current, Dr. Zhang`s research has been supported by four national or provincial grants. He has 20 publications on the journal such as Cell Stem Cell, Journal of Hepatology, Hepatology, and Biomaterials, etc. with a total impact factor 178.838; total citation on Google Scholar 208; he also is an inventor on 9 major patents including being a lead inventor on patents on patch grafting strategies. His current research interests include hepatic-maturation of stem cells post-grafting, as well as glycosaminoglycans in stem cell expansion and cell fate determination.



Dr. Xufeng Yao

Dr. Xufeng Yao

Professor
Vice Dean
School of Medical Imaging, Shanghai University of Medicine and Health Sciences, China
Speech Title:

Biography: Dr. Xufeng Yao works as a professor, doctoral supervisor, vice dean of the school of medical imaging, Shanghai University of Medicine and Health Sciences, China. Once, he received his bachelor in medical imaging from Shandong First Medical University, and graduated from Fudan University for his PhD in biomedical engineering, and was a post-doctoral student in optical engineering at University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, China. He was also appointed as a permanent member of the committee of life electronics branch of China institute of electronics society. His current research interest focuses on artificial intelligence in imaging and omics for medicine. He won about 10 funds of national science foundation of China, Shanghai natural science foundation, China postdoctoral foundation, innovation fund of Shanghai Education Commission, etc. Recently, he has published more than 40 academic papers and reviewed for some SCI journals and international conferences. Till now, he has trained above 20 graduate students.



Dr. Masanori Kikuchi

Dr. Masanori Kikuchi

Professor,
Group Leader, Bioceramics Group
Research Center for Macromolecules and Biomaterials
National Institute for Materials Science, Japan
Speech Title: Antimicrobial Ability of HAp/Col by Loading Gentamicin or Ag Nanoparticles

Abstract: Hydroxyapatite/collagen bone-like nanocomposite (HAp/Col) has similar nanostructure and chemical composition to bone, and is incorporated into bone remodeling process to be substituted with new bone after osteoclastic resorption of the HAp/Col. The HAp/Col porous body has already been used practical medicine in Japan. On the other hand, preventing implant associated infection (IAI) is important for success of surgical treatments. In order to minimize IAI for bone void fillers, the followings are considered to be necessary; 1. Cleanness of surgical operation circumstances, 2. Add antimicrobial property to materials, 3. Bone void fillers should be dissolved/resorbed in appropriate time. The first one depends on each hospital/country, but third one is fortunately cleared for the HAp/Col; therefore, we tried to add antimicrobial property to the HAp/Col utilizing gentamicin or silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). The HAp/Col soaked in gentamicin suspension adsorbed gentamicin sufficiently. Release profile showed gentamicin on the HAp/Col was released completely in 3 days which is considered acceptable for the HAp/Col because incorporation of the HAp/Col into bone remodeling process starts in 5 days after implantation. Gentamicin added to the HAp/Col paste inhibited hardening process when its concentration was too high. Silver nanoparticles also adsorbed on the HAp/Col sufficiently. Gentamicin- and AgNPs-loaded HAp/Col indicated good antimicrobial activity and showed no cytotoxicity in the appropriate range of loading. These antimicrobial HAp/Cols are expected to be better bone void fillers.
Keywords: Hydroxyapatite, collagen, bone-like nanocomposite, bone-void fillers, antimicrobial property

Biography: Prof. Masanori Kikuchi had gotten his Ph.D. degree from Waseda University, Japan on March 1995 by the research on cation exchanged hydroxyapatites. He joined National Institute for research in Inorganic Materials (now it changed National Institute for Materials Science, NIMS, by merger with National Research Institute for Metal) in 1995 and promoted as a group leader of Bioceramics Group in 2007. After Joining NIMS, he worked on calcium phosphate based bioceramics and composite biomaterials for bone regeneration. One of his main topics is hydroxyapatite/collagen bone-like nanocomposite (HAp/Col) and its first paper on Biomaterials 2001 has been cited more than 800 in SCOPUS (more than 1,100 in Google Scholar). The HAp/Col porous body is sold in Japan from 2013 and widely used in both orthopedic and dental fields. He also works on functionalization of biominerals from sea urchin, antithrombogenic surface treatment of Ti and international standardization of bioceramics.
He is a professor at the University of Tsukuba, visiting professor at Hokkaido University and guest professor at Okayama University. He also serves for ISO as a convenor of ISO/TC 150/SC 1/WG 3 from 2011 and head of Japanese delegation for ISO/TC 150 from 2023. He win several awards including Ichimura Academic Award from The New Technology Development Foundation and 74th Award of The Ceramic Society of Japan.



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